Recent Blog Posts

What comes to mind when you think of forests? Do they conjure feelings of tranquility, scenic landscapes, and wildlife? Or maybe you think of the great outdoors? Although these sentiments are commonly tied to forests, there is another type of forest that is rarely talked about but is key in responsible forestry: community forests. As the world becomes more urban, now is the time to invest in healthy community forests. Read the complete Why Community Forests are Key to Solving Chllenges of Urban Living article here. Sourced from Triple Pundit
The number of children packed into overcrowded homes remains high and comes at a tremendous social cost. The nation's tight housing market has been the subject of plenty of news stories, as stagnant incomes and rapidly rising prices in many cities have made it harder for middle-class residents to afford a mortgage. In several places, it's increasingly difficult for tenants even to find places they can afford to rent. Read the complete Children May Suffer Worst Effects of Housing Crunch story here. Sourced from Governing.  
The Thomson Reuters Foundation will be expanding its property rights coverage with the addition of Citiscope, an online platform created to help cities work better for all people through the power of independent journalism. Citiscope, previously hosted under its own domain, will become part of PLACE, the Thomson Reuters Foundation’s website dedicated to reportage on land and property rights. Read the complete Thomas Reuters Foundation Expands Coverage of Cities article. Sourced from Place
Posted In: City CED, Health and Wellness in the City
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The Millennial Generation (Upcoming event) Millennials are the nation’s largest—and most diverse—generation in American history. On January 30, experts will discuss how they are set to serve as a social, economic, and political bridge to chronologically successive (and increasingly) racially diverse generations. Sourced from Brookings
Executive Perspective: What's Next for Smart Cities? Smart City projects are gathering momentum, assisted by the availability and adoption of new, “smart” technologies that take advantage of the explosion in connected devices and the Internet of Things (IoT). These include networks of sensors, fixed and mobile smart devices, and systems that monitor and manage many elements of our public services and infrastructure, collecting vast amounts of data that can be used to improve life for citizens. As such, online communities and forums; voice, video, and text recording and analytics; feedback management; and desktop and process analytics can help provide valuable insight into citizens’ issues and concerns — and how various service elements are captured, processed, and resolved. Read the whole story about Executive Perspective: What's Next for Smart Cities here. Site registration (free) may be required. Sourced from Governing

A defining year for cities. In many U.S. cities, events in 2017 sparked discussions about critical issues like climate change, race relations, immigration, and even the location of Amazon’s next headquarters. Read the seven most important takeaways from the year for metropolitan America here.  

Sourced from Brookings
Five Director/Administrators, one from each region, provides two of their best and biggest ideas inviting their colleagues to “think differently” about Extension. Follow this link to the recorded video of ECOP Next Generation Extension Learning for Leaders: 10 Big Ideas.  
Posted In: City CED, Urban Serving Universities
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December 11-13, 2017 NUEL Logo Renaissance Nashville Hotel - Nashville, Tennessee You are invited to the National Urban Extension’s Leader’s (NUEL) semi-annual meeting in Nashville, December 11-13. The meeting will begin on Monday, December 11 at 8 a.m. and conclude on Wednesday, December 13, at 12 p.m. If you are interested in joining the meeting to learn more about NUEL’s efforts, our time in Nashville is dedicated to engaging with each other to assess intersections of collaboration with other colleagues from your region and from across the country as we advance urban Extension efforts. We are actively recruiting individuals and teams to join NUEL’s regional caucuses and plug into action team work as we works across Cooperative Extension. Click for link to Registration - Registration fee: $250 (before November 24) Click for link to Hotel Reservation - By November 6, book your group rate for NUEL Meeting - University of TN For additional meeting information, click this link.  
Posted In: Urban Serving Universities
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Are you interested in Extension in urban areas and ready to improve your knowledge, skills, and results? Participate in this new comprehensive professional development program to learn about leadership, networks, innovation, and management. This online program will prepare you, as an Extension professional, to be relevant locally, responsive statewide, and recognized nationally. The program was developed based on a foundation of entrepreneurial theory and urban Extension practice and will build upon existing leadership experiences, management training, and Extension professional development. You will learn from experienced leaders; apply what you learn in your city, region, or state; engage in critical thinking and creative problem solving; and participate in online collaborative learning. Each competency-based module incorporates interactive digital delivery and the flipped classroom model for active learning and engagement. Through this course, you will meet peers from across the country and develop a plan and portfolio of resources to improve your leadership ability and community conditions. The investment in the program is $500 plus a commitment to work hard and have fun investing 8-14 hours per week. The eight-week online course begins September 8. This course is led by Dr. Julie Fox from Ohio State University Extension. Complete details and registration can be found at https://cityextension.osu.edu/leadership. The deadline for registration is August 25 and is limited to 20 participants.

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