Lucas County

Celebrating Family and Consumer Sciences Educator Day on Wednesday, February 12, 2020

Family and Consumer Sciences (FCS): the field of study focused on the science and art of living and working well in our complex world. Family and Consumer Sciences Educators: career title of individuals most often found working in secondary, post-secondary, and Extension programs. Who should celebrate Family and Consumer Sciences Educator Day? Anyone who wants to:
  • celebrate Family and Consumer Sciences Educators
  • share the story of FCS education's relevance in today’s society, and effectiveness in addressing modern life needs within our United States
  • encourage students to consider careers as FCS educators
I am a Family and Consumer Sciences educator in an urban county. In many ways my programming looks similar to my colleagues in rural counties but there are some differences. While I feel self-conscious about taking a day to promote my work, I’m starting to understand the importance of FCS Educator Day. When I look at the inspiring work that my colleagues are doing across the state, in urban, rural, and suburban communities I realize that it’s a wonderful opportunity to highlight the stories and work of FCS Educators. The theme for promoting FCS careers is: Making a Difference Through Family and Consumer Sciences. I’m confident my FCS colleagues would be making a difference, no matter what their field of work. When I think about this group of individual professionals, working in different communities across the state, there are notable commonalities. One specific trait I notice in my peers is that every one of us is a Problem Solver. We certainly don’t look at everything the same way, act in the same way, or solve problems in the same way; but I cannot think of an example when my colleagues weren’t willing to jump in and help create solutions. The problem solving is not limited to just offering advice. My colleagues actively help work on and contribute to solutions. Occasionally, challenges are easily identified and then fixed. More often, especially when working with people and families, there is no one right answer. Sometimes it’s even difficult to determine the specific dilemma. Most solutions take time and require dedication and effort. My colleagues don’t shy away from a challenge. Because we work in various counties across the state, most of us do not see one another on a regular basis. We rely on technology to call, zoom, and share resources. Even without working together in the same physical space, FCS educators often work as teams and therefor are good at co-creating solutions. For FCS Educator Day,
  • If you are a problem solver and you’re considering your best career path, learn more about Family and Consumer Sciences. It’s a field of study that benefits a variety of careers.
  • If you are reading this and thinking, “I know an FCS Educator,” take a moment to let them know what you appreciate about them. If someone is comfortable being in the spotlight, please share their story widely. If someone prefers working in the background, it’s a good time to recognize what they contribute to this field. Send a note, post a message, or share a picture of the professionals that contribute to strong families and communities.
  • If you are reading this and thinking, “I wish I knew an FCS Educator” check out your local schools and Extension office. Occasionally, FCS is not given the recognition it deserves. While FCS Educators could be spending more time promoting the work they do, my guess is that most of my peers will spend FCS Educator Day, similar to other workdays. They will be building a better community, working with one person, family, or class at a time and not necessarily seeking accolades.
Follow this link to learn more about FCS Educator Day. Article courtesy of Patrice Powers-Barker, Extension Educator, Family and Consumer Sciences, Lucas County, Ohio FCS
Metroparks Toledo recently hosed an outdoor expo at Middlegrounds Metropark, a free peek at a few of the ways that locals can play in the sprawling park system. As they move ahead with plans to open two new city-centric green spaces next year, it’s also a way to extend a hand to a downtown community where they’re arriving as a relatively new neighbor. Some who attended the expo at Middlegrounds weren't just taking advantage of  the sunshine, they also wanted to let everyone know the outdoors are for everyone. Kelly Milewski, Environmental Education Specialist for Metroparks Toledo said "Even if you have a disability we want to put you in a tree or in a canoe just like anybody else would be able to. At our parks, we want to make sure everybody's inclusive, everybody's welcome, and everybody feels welcome here." Follow this link to read more. Sourced from: WTOL & The Toledo Blade
Join Lucas County Extension and learn creative solutions to continue working in your urban garden or small farm with a disability, chronic pain, or other limitations. The presenter will be Laura Akgerman, Disability Services Coordinator with the Ohio State University Ohio AgrAbility. The program is free for all participants, but registration is required to supply adequate materials. The presentation will be held at the Conference Center at Toledo Botanical Garden on April 10, 2019 from 12-1:30 p.m. Follow this link for the event flyer. Follow this link for registration information. Sourced from: Lucas County Extension
Extension Master Gardener Volunteers (MVG) from Lucas County gathered to celebrate the 2018 class and their efforts across the county. The theme for this year’s recognition celebration was "From Farm to Fork." Their guest was Kurt Bench. Kurt and his family run Shared Legacy Farm in Elmore, Ohio. Kurt shared with the volunteers his family’s rich agriculture roots, and how he has made his own niche and has a very successful certified organic farm that includes a Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) program. As consumers, MGVs where interested in his story and the topic of local foods. MGVs are Extension volunteers and partner with many local organizations and agencies including: Metroparks Toledo, Toledo GROWs, Hawkins Elementary School, Olander Park, and the Garden Forum’s Junior Garden Club. The volunteers also learned about a new opportunity called the Garden Ambassador Program that will be in collaboration with Metro Parks Toledo at the Toledo Botanical Garden and the Shipman Garden at Wildwood Metro Park. In 2018 Master Gardner Volunteers recorded nearly 5,000 hours. Follow this link to learn more about Lucas County Master Gardeners. Sourced from: OSU Extension