Recent Blog Posts

The Michigan State University Extension Tollgate Farm and Education Center is hosting a virtual professional development panel discussion series for formal and non-formal educators about learning to better incorporate the perspectives of those with whom we work in schools and educational programs. Moderators and panelists from each community provide a chance for educators to deepen their teaching practice in a safe online space for open conversation and community.

To learn more or to register: https://events.anr.msu.edu/TollgatePerspectivesSeries/

Upcoming sessions include:
November 4 – Incorporating Indigenous Perspectives and Maple Sugaring Experiences in Place-based Teaching and Learning
December 2 - Incorporating Black Perspectives in Place-Based Teaching and Learning
February 3 - Special Needs Perspectives and PBE In and Beyond the Classroom
March 3 - Engaging with LGTBQ+IA Communities in PBE in Formal and Non-Formal Settings
April 7 - A Latinx Lens: Incorporating Latinx Perspectives through Place-Based Educational Programming
May 5 -Incorporating Asian Principles, Practices, and People in Community- and Place-Based Learning

The National Urban Extension Leaders (NUEL) will hold the 2022 National Urban Extension Conference (NUEC22), in Camden, New Jersey, on May 23-26, 2022. The conference will offer in-person experiences and virtual participation options, exploring the theme of "Reimagining Our Future...Together."  The conference will provide opportunities to share research and innovative educational strategies that address the needs of urban, suburban, and peri-urban populations as well as urban-rural interdependencies. Proposals will be accepted for individual presentations, panels, lightning talks, and posters for NUEC22. Abstracts that highlight research or outreach activities that involve partnerships between researchers, practitioners and Extension professionals are especially encouraged. Proposal deadline is November 20. Follow this link for all the details.

A team of researchers at Cornell Tech has developed a forecast of urban technology trends over the coming decade, predicting movements in machine learning, life sciences, infrastructure and other fields. Cornell Tech, Cornell University’s tech-focused research campus, has developed a forecast for how technologies like artificial intelligence could shape cities in the coming decade. After a year of work, the team released its first “Horizon Scan” report last week to discuss the potential risks and applications of recent advancements in urban tech. Follow this link to read more.

Sourced from Government Technology

OSU Extension has joined the global community in celebration of Urban October. Urban October was created by UN Habitat as an opportunity for everyone to be part of the conversation about the challenges and opportunities created by the fast rate of change in cities and towns. Ohio’s theme is Celebrating Ohio Cities – Where We Live, Work, Play, Learn, and Serve. Celebrating Urban October provides a foundation for deeper engagement that contributes to healthy urban communities and urban-, suburban-, and rural-relationships. For easy ideas to implement and graphics you can share follow this link to the Urban October Toolkit.

Posted In:
Tags:
Comments: 0

Using one image and 100 words share what you have been doing to “create opportunities for people to explore how science-based knowledge can improve social, economic, and environmental conditions in our urban and metro communities. We will help share these stories during Urban October. Submit your stories here go.osu.edu/urbanstories.

Last Friday, nearly 50 urban Extension colleagues gathered virtually for the OSU Extension Annual Urban Summit. During the Summit folks shared their gifts with the group, heard from Brian Raison about storytelling to connect to your audience, worked through scenarios in situation rooms, and learned about how they can get involved in Urban October. Resources shared from the Summit are located here.

Ohio State University Extension is celebrating “Urban October,” a worldwide campaign the United Nations launched to focus on the opportunities and challenges created by the fast rate of change in cities. The theme of Ohio’s monthlong campaign is “Celebrating Ohio Cities—Where We Live, Work, Play, Learn, and Serve.” This is OSU Extension’s first year participating in Urban October. In the coming years, the Extension team looks forward to collaborating with additional university and community partners to build on this foundation and foster local, state, national, and global connections. For more information about Extension’s Urban October efforts, visit go.osu.edu/urbanoctober

Following the success of their 2019 summer program at the National Youth Sports Program camp (NYSP), Ohio State University Extension Cuyahoga County entered into a 5-year agreement (OSUE and Case Western Reserve University) to provide the “Where Does your Food Come From?” program each summer during NYSP Camp. The 5-week camp runs from the beginning of June through the first week of July and encompasses all four Extension program areas (4-H, Agriculture and Natural Resources, Community Development, and Family and Consumer Sciences). Topics include food science and food science career exploration, Agri-science and nutrition, food safety, gardening and insects, and mental health and physical activity. OSU Extension staff provide the interactive lessons to all 8–10-year-olds and arranges a field trip to a local farm. In addition, 4-H staff and volunteers also arranged a drone program for all 800 campers during the 2019 program year and provided Health Rocks! programs in 2021. Unfortunately, due to COVID, NYSP did not take place in 2020, but thanks to the wonderful partnership between OSU Extension and CWRU and the trusting relationship and safety plan that was established, OSU Extension was approved to continue programming in 2021. The leadership worked diligently to maintain safety procedures that highlighted the flexibility of each staff and dedication to the youth. This video link highlights this years’ camp.

Sourced from Ohio State University Extension Cuyahoga County

4-H Youth Development prides itself on providing essential resources to reach underserved minority populations. 4-H provides programming and professional development for volunteers to include diverse hands-on training, and cultural competency workshops. This JOE article provides best practices for the inclusion of African American volunteers in 4-H programming efforts that could help extension educators better understand the need to include minority volunteer roles and responsibilities. These strategies include strengthening diverse volunteer make-up, increasing participation and trust among African American youth, and engaging volunteers working in educational organizations that could provide real world experiences for youth. Authors: Maurice Smith Jr. and Shannon Wiley. Follow this link to read the article.

Sourced from Journal of Extension

All too often we witness subtle comments or behaviors rooted in bias that cause harm to others, many times directed toward people in vulnerable populations. Have you ever been in a situation like that and wanted to say or do something, but didn't know what to do? Anyone can become an active bystander and learn to address explicit and implicit bias. In this 90-minute, interactive webinar, you will learn about some of the most common forms of bias and identify tools you can use as an active bystander to interrupt bias in daily life. This webinar will be presented on Thursday, September 30, 1-2:30 p.m. ET by Dr. Leo Taylor. Follow this link to register.

Sourced from the CFAES Office of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion

Pages